Kage Kaisen Revival!

January 19th 2010, 6:45 pm by Kensei

.SITE RENOVATION.

To all our members,

I (Kensei), have decided to renovate the site, which has remained dead since our head Administrator, Baraku, went absent. There will be a new set of rules, a new skin, new profile formats...

Basically, we're starting the site over.

But don't be alarmed. For those of you who choose to return, you will not have to rewrite your application, or change it to the present system. Your applications are still there, resting in the Filing Cabinet -- feel free and ask the Staff to repost it if it has already been approved, or ask them to read over the application and approve it, then move it to the Approved sub-boards.

If you do not wish to roleplay on the site any longer, or the renovation does not appeal to you, all you have to do is tell the Staff in a PM ; your account will be removed without any questions.

We apologize for any inconveniences, and thank you all for your patience and cooperation.


Your loving (new) head Admin,
Kensei


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The Revolution Will Not Be Televis

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The Revolution Will Not Be Televis

Post by lynk2510 on March 18th 2011, 5:54 pm

The film was positively received by mainstream film critics and won several awards. Reviewers cited the filmmakers' unprecedented proximity to key events and praised the film for its "riveting narrative";[1] criticism focused on its lack of context and pro-Chávez bias. First shown on television in Europe and Venezuela in 2003, The Revolution Will Not Be Televised later appeared at film festivals and secured a limited theatrical release on the art house circuit. Independent activists held unofficial screenings, and Venezuelan government officials encouraged its circulation to build support for Chávez's administration. The film is regularly shown on Venezuelan television, and in the capital it is often broadcast during "contentious political conjunctures".[2] The Revolution Will Not Be Televised paints Chávez in a favorable light, which has led to disputes over its neutrality and accuracy; particular attention is paid to its framing of the violence of 11–13 April, the filmmakers' editing of the timeline, and the alleged omission of incidents and personnel. The film is variously cited as an accurate portrayal or a misrepresentation of the events of April 2002.
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